Mutton Rogan Josh Kashmiri Pandit style
Slow cooked mutton dish from Kashmir, a classic made Kashmiri Pandit style without the use of onions and garlic. The key here is the flavour the mutton gets from the slow cooking. There is not much of gravy by the end of the dish but the flavour speaks for itself.
Servings Prep Time
4people 10minutes
Cook Time
2 1/2hours
Servings Prep Time
4people 10minutes
Cook Time
2 1/2hours
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a heavy bottomed pan or a wok, heat the mustard oil. Once it reaches smoking point, add the spices for tempering, ie cloves, cinnamon, black cardamom and bay leaf. Once they start to spluter, add the ratanjot. Ratanjot basically adds the extra red colour to the dish.
  2. Now add the mutton pieces. Add the dry ginger powder and start browning the meat over high heat for about 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Now lower the heat and add salt. Continue stirring. Scrape the pan for the fat which will stick.
  4. In a bowl, whisk the yogurt with the heeng and then add a couple of tbsp of this to the mutton. Stir it well for a few minutes.
  5. If your mutton is releasing too much water, increase the flame for sometime.
  6. The process now is basically to gradually add yogurt and continue cooking. You do need to cover the pan also when you lower the heat for the mutton to cook slowly. Then femove the cover, increase the heat for sometime and keep stirring and slowly cooking the meat.
  7. This entire process takes about an hour and half. At this point you mutton is almost cooked.
  8. Then add the garam masala powder and the red chilli powder. Stir for sometime and then again cover and cook.
  9. By this time the meat would have become rich dark red in colour. Finally check the seasoning once more and turn off the heat if the meat has become tender.
  10. This dish is all about having the patience and slowly cooking with the yogurt.
  11. Serve mutton rogan josh with steamed rice.
Recipe Notes

 

The amount of heeng or asafetida used depends on the potency of the spice. Too much heeng makes the dish bitter. So use wisely. The heeng I use is from Kabul gifted from a very dear friend. It is so strong that just a drop of it mixed with a bit of water is more than enough for any dish.